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19 posts tagged with "Azure DevOps"

The Azure DevOps suite of tools.

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Using Bun in Azure Pipelines

· 2 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

I'm a keen user of Bun. Bun is a fast TypeScript / JavaScript runtime which can be used to speed up the TypeScript / JavaScript you have. It's a drop-in replacement for Node.js, and it's compatible with the vast majority of the Node.js ecosystem. (There are still rough edges that have issues.) In this post we'll look at how to use it in Azure Pipelines.

title image reading "Using Bun in Azure Pipelines" with the Bun and Azure Pipelines logos

Bicep lint with Azure Pipelines and GitHub Actions

· 10 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

Bicep has had linting since version 0.4.1. It's a great way to ensure that your bicep files conform to best practices. Interestingly, when the linting feature first shipped, there wasn't an explicit lint command as part of the CLI. Instead, you had to run bicep build and it would run the linter as part of the build process. This was a little confusing as it was not obvious that the linter was running.

As of version 0.21.1 there is a dedicated bicep lint command. This is a nice step forwards; it allows you to explicitly lint your your code, rather than have it happen as a side effect of build. And it is useful if you want to run the linter as part of a CI/CD pipeline. What's more the bicep lint command is now available in the Azure CLI as well. You can run az bicep lint to lint your bicep files.

In this post we'll look at how to run lint Bicep in Azure Pipelines and GitHub Actions, and surface the output in the UI.

title image reading "Bicep lint with Azure Pipelines and GitHub Actions" with the Bicep logo

Private Bicep registry authentication with AzureResourceManagerTemplateDeployment@3

· 3 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

If you deploy Bicep templates to Azure in Azure DevOps, you'll likely use the dedicated Azure DevOps task; the catchily named AzureResourceManagerTemplateDeployment@3. This task has had support for deploying Bicep since early 2022. But whilst vanilla Bicep is supported, there's a use case which isn't supported; private Bicep registries.

title image reading "Private Bicep registry authentication with AzureResourceManagerTemplateDeployment@3" with the Bicep, Azure and Azure DevOps logos

Permissioning Azure Pipelines with Bicep and Azure RBAC Role Assignments

· 9 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

How can we deploy resources to Azure, and then run an integration test through them in the context of an Azure Pipeline? This post will show how to do this by permissioning our Azure Pipeline to access these resources using Azure RBAC role assignments. It will also demonstrate a dotnet test that runs in the context of the pipeline and makes use of those role assignments.

title image reading "Permissioning Azure Pipelines with Bicep and Role Assignments" and some Azure logos

VSTS and EF Core Migrations

· 6 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

Let me start by telling you a dirty secret. I have an ASP.Net Core project that I build with VSTS. It is deployed to Azure through a CI / CD setup in VSTS. That part I'm happy with. Proud of even. Now to the sordid hiddenness: try as I might, I've never found a nice way to deploy Entity Framework database migrations as part of the deployment flow. So I have [blushes with embarrassment] been using the Startup of my ASP.Net core app to run the migrations on my database. There. I said it. You all know. Absolutely filthy. Don't judge me.

VSTS... YAML up!

· 5 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

For the longest time I've been using the likes of Travis and AppVeyor to build open source projects that I work on. They rock. I've also recently been dipping my toes back in the water of Visual Studio Team Services. VSTS offers a whole stack of stuff, but my own area of interest has been the Continuous Integration / Continuous Deployment offering.

TFS 2012 meet PowerShell, Karma and BuildNumber

· 6 min read
John Reilly
OSS Engineer - TypeScript, Azure, React, Node.js, .NET

To my lasting regret, TFS 2012 has no direct support for PowerShell. Such a shame as PowerShell scripts can do a lot of heavy lifting in a build process. Well, here we're going to brute force TFS 2012 into running PowerShell scripts. And along the way we'll also get Karma test results publishing into TFS 2012 as an example usage. Nice huh? Let's go!